Acculturation Experience

Acculturation Experience

Describe your acculturation experience as a new graduate to the culture of the nursing profession. How is it similar or different from the acculturation experience of a new nursing colleague who joined your team within the past year?

Submission Instructions:

  • Your initial post should be at least 500 words, formatted and cited in current APA style with support from at least 2 academic sources Acculturation Experience

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Acculturation Experience

Describe your acculturation experience as a new graduate to the culture of the nursing profession. How is it similar or different from the acculturation experience of a new nursing colleague who joined your team within the past year?

Submission Instructions:

· Your initial post should be at least 500 words, formatted and cited in current APA style with support from at least 2 academic sources Acculturation Experience.

Your assignment will be graded according to the grading rubric.

Discussion Rubric
Criteria Ratings Points
Identification of Main Issues, Problems, and Concepts 5 points Distinguished

Identify and demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the issues, problems, and concepts.

4 points Excellent

Identifies and demonstrate an accomplished understanding of most of issues, problems, and concepts.

2 points Fair

Identifies and demonstrate an acceptable understanding of most of issues, problems, and concepts.

1 points Poor

Identifies and demonstrate an unacceptable understanding of most of issues, problems, and concepts.

5 points
Use of Citations, Writing Mechanics and APA Formatting Guidelines 3 points Distinguished

Effectively uses the literature and other resources to inform their work. Exceptional use of citations and extended referencing. High level of APA precision and free of grammar and spelling errors.

2 points Excellent

Effectively uses the literature and other resources to inform their work. Moderate use of citations and extended referencing. Moderate level of APA precision and free of grammar and spelling errors.

1 point Fair

Ineffectively uses the literature and other resources to inform their work. Moderate use of citations and extended referencing. APA style and writing mechanics need more precision and attention to detail.

0 point Poor

Ineffectively uses the literature and other resources to inform their work. An unacceptable use of citations and extended referencing. APA style and writing mechanics need serious attention.

3 points

Understanding Culture in the Context of Healthcare

Cultural orientation is just one of many different perspectives that individuals draw on as they make health and healthcare decisions. Individual psychology, past experiences, religious and spiritual views, social position, socioeconomic status, and family norms all can contribute to a person’s health beliefs and practices. These beliefs and practices can also change over time and may be expressed differently in different situations and circumstances. Because of the significant variability in health beliefs and behaviors seen among members of the same cultural group, an approach to cultural competency that emphasizes a knowledge set of specific cultural health practices in different cultural groups could lead to false assumptions and stereotyping. Knowledge is important, but it only goes so far. Instead, an approach that focuses on the healthcare provider acquiring skills and attitudes relating to open and effective communication styles is a preferable approach to culturally effective and informed care. Such an approach does not rely on rote knowledge of facts that may change depending on time, place, and individuals. Instead, it provides a skills toolbox that can be used in all circumstances. The following skills can lead to a culturally informed approach to care: Acculturation Experience

1.

Don’t assume. Presupposing that a particular patient may have certain beliefs, or may act in a particular way based on their cultural group affiliation, could lead to incorrect assumptions. Sources of intracultural diversity are varied.

2.

Practice humility. Cultural humility has been described byHook et al. (2013) as “the ability to maintain an interpersonal stance that is other-oriented (or open to the other) in relation to aspects of cultural identity.” Cultural humility goes beyond cultural competency in that it requires the clinician to self-reflect and acknowledge that one’sown cultural orientation enters into any transaction with a patient (seeChapter 2.1)Acculturation Experience.

Cultural humility aims to fix power imbalances between the dominant (hospital-medical) culture and the patient. It recognizes the value of the patient’s culture and incorporates the patient’s life experiences and understanding outside the scope of the provider; it creates a collaboration and a partnership.

Cultural competency is an approach that typically focuses on the patient’s culture, whereas cultural humility acknowledges that both physicians and patients have cultural orientations, and that a successful relationship requires give and take among those differing perspectives. It also includes an understanding that differences in social power, which are inherent in the physician–patient relationship, need to be understood and addressed so that open communication can occur.

3.

Understand privilege. Members of the majority culture have certain privileges and benefits that are often unrecognized and unacknowledged. For example, they can have high expectations that they will be positively represented in media such as movies and television. Compared with minority groups, those in the majority culture have less chance of being followed by security guards at stores, or having their bags checked. They have a greater chance of having a positive reception in a new neighborhood, or of finding food in the supermarket that is consistent with one’s heritage. These privileges typically go unnoticed by members of the majority culture, but their absence is painfully recognized by members of nonmajority cultural groups. The culturally informed physician should try to be mindful of these privileges, and how they may influence the interaction between physicians and patients.

4.

Be inquisitive. Because of the significant amount of intracultural diversity of beliefs and practices, the only way to know a particular patient’s approach to issues concerning health and illness is through direct and effective communication. Asking about the patient’s/family’s perspective in an inquisitive and respectful manner will usually be met with open and honest responses, as long as the patient does not feel looked down on and the questions are asked in genuine interest. Obtaining ahealth beliefs history is an effective way of understanding clinical issues from the patient’s and family’s perspective (Table 11.2) Acculturation Experience. The health beliefs history gathers information on the patient’s views on the identification of health problems, causes, susceptibility, signs and symptoms, concerns, treatment, and expectations. Responses gathered from the health beliefs history can be helpful in guiding care plans and health education interventions.

5.

Be flexible. As members of the culture of medicine, clinicians have been educated and acculturated to the biomedical model as the optimal approach to health and illness. Patients and families may have health beliefs and practices that do not fully fit the biomedical model. Traditional beliefs and practices may be used in tandem with biomedical approaches. An individual’s approach to health rarely is exclusively biomedical or traditional, and often a combination of multiple approaches. The health beliefs history provides clinicians with information regarding the nonbiomedical beliefs and practices that may be held by the patient. Culturally informed physicians should be flexible and find ways of integrating nonharmful traditional beliefs and practices into the medical care plan to make that plan fit the patient’s needs and worldview. This will likely result in better adherence to treatment and prevention Acculturation Experience.

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